adelestudio03_opt.jpg

Even with the 4am start, Adele Roberts is in no doubt that she has the best job in the world:  the presenter of Radio 1’s Early Breakfast Show only wishes she could go back and show her teenage self what she’s doing now…

Adele grew up listening to Pete Tong’s Essential Mixes on Radio 1 whilst daydreaming about being a DJ. Now she’s fronting their Early Breakfast Show.

Every weekday morning, from 4-6.30am, Adele can be found offering her own irresistible style of playful camaraderie to her ‘early morning crew’ of listeners, championing new artists and live music, as well as playing chart favourites, and stamping her very distinctive sparkle onto the show.

Adele made the move to Radio 1 in May 2015, after three fantastic years at sister station, 1Xtra, where her weekend afternoon show allowed her to “play music so fresh it had literally been burnt that morning.”

Nobody on air is having more fun. But Adele – whose twin passions have always been music and fitness - has worked hard to get there.

Her CV starts with a job collecting glasses in a Southport nightclub in 1995 at the age of 16. After hours, when everybody had gone home, Adele would slip onto the decks and teach herself to DJ.

Her first stint on radio was at a student station in Leeds, playing a hybrid of dance, club classics, RnB and HipHop. Whilst at the University, she also secured a residency at legendary house club, SpeedQueen – where she is resident DJ to this day.

Adele’s radio pedigree is rock solid. In the decade from 2001 to 2011, she honed her skills on the airwaves of Lancashire’s Rock FM, then on digital station The Hits, followed by the Galaxy Network and Capital FM, before being signed up by the BBC.

Along the way, she has performed at the legendary Creamfields festival, in Ayia Napa and in Ibiza.

In recent years, as well as talking music with superstars from Jennifer Lopez to 50 Cent, she has seized her opportunity to offer inspiration to others. Adele has fronted documentaries, for 1Xtra, on subjects as diverse as coming out, female boxing and the words of warning female offenders can offer vulnerable young people.

The way Adele sees it, when she was growing up, there were not many people like her – mixed race, gay and from a council estate in the North West – as visible role models. She welcomes the chance to change that, even a little bit.

And she’s proud and honoured  - not to mention a little bit amazed - to be where she is today.

“Radio 1 was beyond my dream,” says Adele. “And yet here I am. I’m just not sure I believe it yet…”

adelestudio03_opt.jpg

GIGS

Twitter

 

Instagram

 
Name *
Name